[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][accordion title=”What are some of the leading journals or other resources that I can subscribe to in order to be up to date on the ever evolving world of research into the many illnesses that ticks carry?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]PubMed.gov is the most complete research database in the country. This is the national library of medicine at NIH. The library, while not including every publication in the world, will give you access to the overwhelming majority of peer reviewed literature in both complementary and alternative medicine approaches for the treatment of Lyme and associated diseases.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”My 84 year old father has lyme disease and was treated with antibiotics for 6-8 weeks. He does have heart fibrillation. Three months later his migraine headaches are worse and he feels dizzy and tired. I have heard that lyme can go into the lining of the heart is this true and how do we test for it? Thank you.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]The heart is one of the organs that can be infection by Lyme (such as Lyme Cardiomyophathy). Long term treatment is required. IV Rocephin or IM Penicillin is frequently required to address this condition. There is no simple test for diagnosis.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Is there a safe method for removing mercury from you body?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]Mercury toxicity is most commonly related to eating fish that have been contaminated with mercury. This is particularly prevalent in the big game fish such as tuna, swordfish, shark, etc. There are a number of different methods that can be used to remove mercury from your body. You need to work with a physician who is trained in chelation therapy.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”I have chronic lymes and now in the absence of antibiotic treatment can/would you recommend alternative treatments such as homeopathic or naturopathic etc?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]The first order of business is making sure the Lyme and any co-infections have been eradicated. The cause of Post-Lyme syndrome, while controversial, has been well-documented to be present in about 20% of patients who were initially diagnosed with Lyme disease. Johns Hopkins University has just opened the first center in the country for the study of Post-Lyme Syndrome headed Dr. John Aucott. The key in any condition is diagnosis. Post-Lyme Syndrome may be a failure to have completely eradicated the disease or its co-infections. Or, it could be the result of an autoimmune process caused by the Lyme itself. It can also be the result of other conditions such as recurrence of EBV (Epstein Bar Virus), Biotoxicity Disorder, or other conditions.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Am I correct in saying to stay away from steroids??” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]As a rule steroids will generally suppress the immune system and people struggling with Lyme disease tend to do worse on steroids and as such they [steroids] should be avoided. However, one should never say never. There are unique circumstances in which steroids can be life-saving and necessary. You need to be working with a physician you trust to make that distinction. It is also important to work with a physician who specializes in treating Lyme disease specifically since this disease impacts the immune system differently than other infectious diseases. In general, steroids should only be used with caution, if at all.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Have you had any dealings with patients who are suffering from tinnitus, along with depression and anxiety? I have a friend who is going through this right now. I had a similar issue which, after 3 years, I resolved by dealing with a supposed copper imbalance as well as getting rid of glyphosates (Monsanto wheat) in my diet. Along with regular meditation, yoga and the addition of curcumin in my diet, this has made an enormous difference in how I feel. Would you care to comment?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]This is exactly the type of workup and treatments that need to be considered in anyone suffering from a chronic illness. Tinnitus in particular can be an extremely difficult problem to address and as you have found can be a result of multiple issues and not a single problem. Meditation and yoga are extremely effective in reducing inflammation, as is curcumin. You also need to identify the causes of the inflammation such as the trace mineral imbalances as well as eliminating anything that may be poisoning your system.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Is there a relationship between quality of sleep and chronic pain?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]Absolutely. Sleep is not a thing but rather a series of different brain waves divided into stages 2, 3, 4 and REM. People who are deficient in 3-4 sleep will present with chronic pain. If you have sleep apnea, where you stop breathing at night, it can cause chronic pain. If you have restless leg syndrome, it can also cause chronic pain. A proper evaluation of the quality and amount of sleep is necessary for anyone suffering from chronic pain and depression.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Can cortisone injections cause nerve pain (not from the actual injection) but from an autoimmune reaction to the substance(s)? I received cortisone injections in my thoracic back over a year ago and the pain in every area that was injected has been excruciating. What strategies might work best to alleviate the pain given that doctors aren’t sure if it is nerve, musculoskeletal, etc.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]Unfortunately, there are reported cases of cortisone actually causing inflammation in the nerves. If the pain is localized, things that may be effective in reducing the pain are use of cold laser therapy and a neural prolotherapy technique that uses 5% mannitol injections into the peripheral nerves, which we have found very effective in a number of peripheral neuropathies. Again, I would want to take a comprehensive look to see if there are other reasons as to why your nervous system is so hyper-reactive.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Would you speak a little about the role of various cytokines in nerve pain, and whether there are ways of balancing or changing this.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]Cytokines are chemical messengers that are secreted by different cells of the body that have effects ranging from inciting nerve repair to causing inflammation and destruction of either pathogens or other nerve tissue and reducing inflammation. In the case of chronic pain, we know that the microglia, which are the innate immune system in the central nervous system, are “stuck” in a mode where they continue to excrete predominantly inflammatory cytokines. Under normal circumstances microglia will shift from producing inflammatory cytokines to anti-inflammatory cytokines and call in other cells in initiate the normal repair process. Balance is restored by eliminating all of the factors that caused the microglia to get turned on in the inflammatory state and then doing things such as meditation, exercise, getting adequate sleep, and using things such as Low dose Naltrexone and tumeric to get the microglia to go back to their resting state.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”Our adult son has CRPS and it is ruining his life. He has tried a multitude of pain meds, nerve blocks etc…none of which cure the problem but only provide short term relief. Are you familiar with Calmare Therapy? The testimonials are very favorable… your opinions please.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]CRPS is a horrific pain condition and I address this condition in my book, Total Recovery. I see a number of patients who suffer from CRPS and a solution can unfortunately illusive. Again, it is important to try and understand why it has caused his nervous system to be so hyper-reactive. He needs to be evaluated for Lyme disease and it’s co-infections, celiac disease, gluten intolerance, neurotoxins associated with mold along with a number of other condition that I addressed in my book. I am familiar with calmare therapy and the research on it looks very exciting. While we do not do this therapy in our office, I have referred patients for this therapy. It is certainly worth the trial for anyone suffering from CRPS.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”What treatments are there for reducing inflammation that may be causing my depression and chronic fatigue? I had neurological Lyme disease that was undiagnosed for many years. For the last two months I have been on an anti-inflammatory diet.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]There are a large number of overlapping conditions that can occur in conjunction with Lyme disease. The first issue is making sure that Lyme and its co-infections such as bartonella have been eradicated. Next, you need to make sure there is no significant overgrowth of bacteria or yeast in the gut that is likely a consequence of the long-term antibiotic therapy you most likely endured from the treatment of the Lyme. Meditation and yoga can be very effective in reducing the inflammation in the central nervous system. Low Dose Naltrexone, and maybe tumeric.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”I have joint pain mainly in my knees and elbows. I went to see my doctor about it and all he said was that it is probably arthritis. What can I do to help alleviate the pain?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]The first issue is always diagnosis. Sometimes arthritis in knees and joints can be from Lyme disease, sometimes, from rheumatoid arthritis, and sometimes from tendonitis. It can also be associated with food allergies and food sensitivities. The first issue is getting a clear diagnosis.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”How do my chronic migraines, fibromyalgia and depression/anxiety tie into problems with losing weight? I know that some of the medicines I take can affect my condition, but when I follow a strict diet regimen and nothing happens I wonder if the inflammation is causing water retention or something else.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]One of the reasons that you may not be able to lose weight, and can also be contributing to a multitude of your medical problems might be related to either food allergies or sensitivities or mold toxicity. We know that the composition of the bacteria in your gut has a very significant effect on your ability to lose or maintain weight. Skinny people have different gut flora than people who are overweight. Given the number of symptoms with which you are suffering, there is no question in my mind that you have a chronic inflammatory condition, but the cause has not been discovered or addressed.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”I know migraines can be caused by different things for different people–light, drinking, dehydration, etc. Do these causes tie into inflammation? Also, do you have any tips for dealing with migraines (especially preventing them)?” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]Dehydration, alcohol, bright lights, are all triggers that can cause migraines. The underlying cause of the migraine is an irritated nervous system. The nervous system is irritated because of an underlying inflammatory condition in the brain. The key to preventing migraines is to identify what it is that is causing the inflammation. I would start with an anti-inflammatory diet of rice, fish, chicken, fresh fruits and vegetables.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion]

[accordion title=”A long but connected problem. I had a medical/therapeutic massage and trauma that had been dormant in my body came to surface causing much pain and my body was not able to release the toxins fast enough & now my blood test shows a marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Whatever supplements I am taking is not working and I don’t want to go on regular pain meds. I have leaky gut and eat an organic low inflammation diet. I also have a couple of mild/traumatic brain injuries that I know is connected to all of this. And the last thing which I also know is connected to my brain/gut and the pain in my body is I went off a narcotic I was on for a very long time and although very slowly my brain still wants something to replace it and I believe is also what’s causing pain/inflammation in my brain/body because of the toxins in my brain for so long.” opened=”1″ class_icon_closed=”plus” class_icon_opened=”minus” border=”true”]This is a difficult problem. I would start by thoroughly looking at your diet and making sure there is nothing still in your diet causing inflammation. I saw one woman who is a vegan, and it turned out she was allergic to blueberries. For ongoing inflammation in the brain tumeric and Low dose naltrexone may be helpful as well as a regular yoga practice.
– Gary Kaplan, D.O.[/accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row]